bare feet in the sand

the beauty of nature in a consumer economy


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WMO: ‘Unprecedented’ global warming from 1990 to 2010

This is scary, but really important.

Summit County Citizens Voice

Rate of sea level rise doubled in the first decade of the 21st century

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — High-impact climate extremes and record warmth in many parts of the world marked the 2000-2010 period, according to the World Meteorological Organization, which last week released a report detailing the globe’s climate during the first 10 years of the 21st century.

It was the warmest decade since the start of modern measurements in 1850, with more national temperature records broken than in any previous decade. Along with analyzing  global and regional temperatures and precipitation, the report took a close look at extreme events, including heat waves in Europe (2203) and Russia (201o), Hurricane Katrina in the United States of America, Tropical Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar, droughts in the Amazon Basin, Australia and East Africa and floods in Pakistan.

The decade was the warmest for both hemispheres and for both land…

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I have been reading in a new book, which I will review soon, about sea levels rising as a consequence of global warming.  A friend of mine found this article.  Don’t forget to click on the left to see the pictures change as sea levels rise.  It may seem like the 25 feet rise won’t happen for so long that it isn’t even worth thinking about.  Think about how many people will be displaced by 5 feet in Back Bay, and remember that Boston has resources and wealth to deal with it.  There are many countries in the South Pacific that will have much more significant flooding and will not have a wealthy nation helping the people who are displaced.

http://boston.com/yourtown/specials/boston_under_water/


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Climate Myths by John J. Berger

I recently read Climate Myths by John J. Berger.  I was hoping to learn more about the science of climate change and what, if any, controversies still exist in the scientific community.  Perhaps my expectations were faulty, but I was sorely disappointed by the book.  The first (and very significant) portion of the book is dedicated to the various organizations that have gone out of their way to dispute climate change and how serious it is.  He mentions organizations that don’t exist anymore, which may be interested to a researcher but seem to have no relevance for me.  What was helpful was his discussion of certain more prominent climate deniers and why their credentials make them less credible than climate scientists who all agree on global warming and its impacts.  However, I didn’t like how far he goes in disparaging some of the organizations, even comparing them to Joseph McCarthy and the anti-communism in the 1950s.

I was disheartened to learn about how the media has helped these organizations and climate deniers by giving them as much air time as the thousands of scientists who agree on the gravity of global warming.  One of Berger’s examples was The Wall Street Journal, and here is an article I found: No Need to Panic About Global Warming.  If you look at the sixteen scientists who signed the articles very few, if any, are on the cutting edge of climate science.

Another reason for my reading the book was to feel more prepared to refute in conversation those who might be on the fence about global warming.  The second (and much shorter) part of the book is helpful for that.  He goes through the various ‘myths’ and why they are flawed.  I was very glad to find out about the reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Cimate Change (IPCC) that operates under the U.N.  American politics being what they are, this seems like a good place to point people.

I hope to find books that I feel more ready to recommend.  This one is helpful only if you’re specifically interested in the organizations (past and present) who have made enough of American doubt climate change so that politicians are unable to make any progress.